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November 2013

posted Dec 18, 2014, 3:11 PM by Henry McTague

Dearest Friends in Christ,

It occurs to me that perhaps the least recognized or appreciated “person” of the Trinity is the Holy Spirit.  In my years growing up in the Catholic Church, the terminology used was the “Holy Ghost.”  That seems to bring up very different images for me – Holy Ghost has a much harsher connotation than Holy Spirit, which somehow raises a gentler image. But whether you are comfortable with the Holy Ghost or the Holy Spirit language, the greater question is who/what is the Third Person of the Trinity in the life of the United Church of Christ?

Scripturally, we believe that the Holy Spirit was a gift promised by Jesus to his followers as he prepared them for his death. “But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you.” (John 14.26)  This gift of the sending of the Spirit was accomplished on Pentecost and has remained with the followers of Christ ever since.  Often the Spirit is referred to as a mighty wind, blowing through the land.

While our worship services focus principally on God and God’s Son, Jesus, we also recognize the presence of the Holy Spirit among us.  We claim that the Spirit is alive, working through us, inspiring and motivating us to live in accordance with God’s will, by serving God and God’s people.  In many ways, the Holy Spirit is the presence of the Living, Still Speaking God loving us and journeying through life with us; a reminder of God’s faithfulness and steadfast loyalty to God’s people.  What a wonderful gift, indeed.

Without the Holy Spirit, we might wander in our own wilderness places, searching, but never finding.  Instead we are deeply blessed by the power of God’s Spirit, and are moved to praise God without ceasing for the joy that is ours.  Perhaps the Holy Spirit should be the most recognized and appreciated “person” of the Trinity.

Wishing you every blessing,

Pastor Gail

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